Sky supports growth of the Journalism Diversity Fund

The Journalism Diversity Fund is expanding into broadcast media with support from Sky.

The fund was established by the newspaper industry to support young people from socially diverse backgrounds and ethnic minority groups to receive journalistic training from the National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ) and Sky’s support will help to increase the number of bursaries that the Journalism Diversity Fund can offer.

Sky, one of the UK’s largest entertainment and communication providers, will be providing financial support to the fund as well as in-kind backing through mentoring and work placements for bursary recipients.

Speaking on behalf of Sky, Andy Cairns, executive editor of Sky Sports News, said: “Sky as a business recognises the value of having a diverse range of voices on and off screen to reflect the diversity of our customers.

“I am a strong supporter of Journalism Diversity Fund recipients and that includes mentoring people who have a true passion and flair for journalism who may not have been able to make it in this industry without the fund.

“I’m proud that Sky is the first broadcaster to support the Journalism Diversity Fund and contributing to the bursary is just one of the many ways that we will continue to encourage the best talent from all walks of life into a great career”.

The fund was set up by the newspaper industry and is currently sponsored by the Newspaper Licensing Agency (NLA) as lead sponsor, as well as The Scott Trust Ltd and Associated Newspapers.

The NCTJ directors agreed at their last board meeting that the fund should extend into broadcast media in line with the Council’s transformation into a multimedia organisation. Sky is the first broadcaster to contribute funding.

David Pugh, managing director of the NLA, said: “Sky’s donation is excellent news and it is encouraging that broadcasters are beginning to contribute to the fund. This seems appropriate in an era of multi-skilled journalists and increasing mobility between press and broadcast.”

Back to news